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DarkChylde
13th October 2012, 12:25 AM
just the other day i was having lunch with someone I'm mildly acquainted with (we aren't friends but i like to sit with her for lunch because she doesn't yap ,whine, crib or talk incessantly about the goings on of her familial private or occupational life).
We were making small conversation and talking shop when i mentioned that
"I'm very fond of the olden names for girls"
she asked like which ones and i said "Like Brunehilde , Contessa , Emanuline , Geraldine , Tabitha , Eustacia.."
at this point she started laughing , the laughter then sort of turned louder ( she started having difficulty curbing clearly) after struggling with with it she teared up a little and then she cried (i'm certain it wasn't laughter since the sounds in the two can be at times very similar)
She was able to curtail the crying immediately , coughed and dabbed and tissue at her eyes and excused herself (in perfect propriety) .

I looked up "simultaneous crying and laughter" but sadly no good credible medical journal or study exists on it.
Further research into the subject shed more light i reckon but didn't exactly explain what happens in this particular situation :

Accurate estimates of the incidence and prevalence of pathological laughing and crying in the setting of specific neurological disorders are not available. Currently available data are limited because of the problem of small sample size. Future larger studies are needed to estimate the actual scope of the problem (http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=103630).

Later on I asked my mom for her two cents and she said that "such things happen to people who can't master their own emotions and are consequently unable to stifle sadness afflicting them effectively , so it's erupts out unwantedly at inappropriate occasions for a lady"

Well my mother's opinion is obviously biased , had i told her this girl was crying frist and THEN laughing , what would that tantamount to? "too much uncontrolled happiness"? that theory doesn't really add up for me.

Appearently just the thing i describe above hinders medical science from honing in on this particular area :

Do patients with pathological laughing and or crying have problems with dysregulation of other emotions such as anger or fear? Is the problem of pathological anger outburst or pathological fear related to the problem of pathological laughing and pathological crying? Diagnostic criteria defining these other emotional conditions need to be developed, and comorbidity studies undertaken in subjects with PLC. (http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=103630)
(PLC = Pathological Crying and Laughter)


What is particularly interesting to me is that person under question is of very sound constitution , and doesn't by large measure fit into the neurotic category of things


Pseudobulbar affect (PBA), emotional lability, labile affect or emotional incontinence refers to a neurologic disorder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurologic_disorder) characterized by involuntary crying or uncontrollable episodes of crying and/or laughing, or other emotional displays.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudobulbar_affect#cite_note-0) PBA occurs secondary to neurologic disease or brain injury (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain_injury).

Also I'm very sure condition isn't secondary to brain injury (i'm not going to ask her for confirmation sake if she's been under brain trauma recently and violate her sensibilities).That would be very offensive especially in the light of what had transpired.


I wonder if there's some spiritual significance that i can't seem to concatenate ?

ButterflyWoman
13th October 2012, 12:40 AM
Lots of people will start to cry when they laugh hard or long. I do on occasion. I don't even think it's necessarily "emotional". It feels to me like some sort of neurological "cross over", very like the way pain and pleasure can sometimes get co-mingled.

Why on earth would you assume this is necessarily pathological?!

DarkChylde
13th October 2012, 01:16 AM
i am by myself not saying that this is "abnormal" or "pathological" just pointing out what the PLC abbreviate stood out for .

also i was thinking we cant strictly classify what are appropriate reactions and which ones are not , for instance if i'm sleep deprived and yawn intensely i will start lacrimating (but not the same sort of aforementioned crying).

in the same vein nursing mothers are known to lactate on hearing an infants cry..so there could be more deeper primordial reflexes at work here.

ButterflyWoman
13th October 2012, 01:23 AM
I still sometimes get a milk "let down" response to the sound of a hungry baby crying (hunger crying is a distinctive sound). My youngest child is ten years old, and I haven't had any milk in years!

CFTraveler
13th October 2012, 03:35 AM
Ok, DC, you opened yourself up for scrutiny. So here it comes:
When I first read it the first thing I thought is "why is he pathologizing what is obviously some sort of strong cathartic phenomenon?" And then I read BW's reply. Then I thought you were probably uncomfortable with emotional people- and by people I mean women. Then I looked again, and I saw your mother's comment, especially regarding stifling sadness- as if this were a virtue. If your mom is as 'self controlled' as she sounds, then it doesn't suprise me.
Sure, emotional incontinence can be a side effect of all kinds of trauma, either physical or psychological- but what you described sounded to me as what BW described- a sudden crossover of emotion- but I also want to say that the list of names you mentioned were funny yet sad at the same time- maybe her granny was a Brunhilde or a Contessa. BTW, may I add Hermenegilda and Theophila (my great grandmother's name) to the list.
To add, I used to cry from happiness a lot when I was younger- it hardly ever happens any more, and I never knew why it happened. And I think I'm more neurotic now than when I was younger. ;)

ButterflyWoman
13th October 2012, 04:13 AM
BTW, may I add Hermenegilda and Theophila (my great grandmother's name) to the list.
I like Beregaria (a very old name, indeed), and Eneburga (an ancestress of mine from the twelfth century).

I DO like Theophila, CFT. The meaning is good, but it's just a cool name.


I used to cry from happiness a lot when I was younger
I still do, sometimes, though not often. The "start crying when laughing long and hard" thing still happens fairly regularly.

The phrase "to laugh until you cry" is a very common idiom. It's a pretty common phenomenon, as well (else it wouldn't be a common idiom). I found plenty on Google by searching for that phrase. Here are only a few:

http://www.prevention.com/node/29491

http://www.lifeslittlemysteries.com/769-can-you-really-laugh-until-you-cry.html

http://www.islandcrisis.net/laugh-until-cry-tears-happiness/

There's plenty more out there, too.

DarkChylde
13th October 2012, 04:59 AM
"why is he pathologizing what is obviously some sort of strong cathartic phenomenon?"
was not ehehe ! - just sharing what happened with a lunch mate :tongue:


Then I thought you were probably uncomfortable with emotional people- and by people I mean women.
no not at all , i like this girl that's why i seek her company solely .


saw your mother's comment, especially regarding stifling sadness- as if this were a virtue. If your mom is as 'self controlled' as she sounds, then it doesn't suprise me.
we are at loggerheads ALL the time , we wave the white flag every now and then but mostly it's always a truce.

As long as the names you ladies provided are authentic they shall be hereby officially added to my list of beautiful girlnames!:-D :heart:

Hermenegilda (i really like this one its very pretty!)
Theophila
Beregaria
Eneburga

I'm very pleased with these ones too :
Carmelavidale
Arragonsha
Tarranoua
Gallenhyllda
Mantissa
Abbeygail

if there was ever an opportunity to name a would be girl child i will indeed very promptly recommend this list (there is such august dignity in these names it cant be explained)

ButterflyWoman
13th October 2012, 05:39 AM
As long as the names you ladies provided are authentic they shall be hereby officially added to my list of beautiful girlnames!
I am an historian. I wouldn't provide inauthentic historical names. ;)

Berengaria of Navarre was the wife of Richard I of England, called Richard Lionheart, though there are plenty of other women who had that name. And Eneburga de Baldric (also known as Erneberga FitzBaldric) was born in 1080 in England, the daughter of a Saxon thane (the name is clearly Saxon, as well, though it appears from the records I've seen that her mother was Norman).

I would also add in Adelaide, which is a somewhat newer coinage, but still goes back several centuries. An Adelaide was the wife of King William IV of England, and Adelaide is the capital of South Australia (named after her). I've always thought it's a particularly pretty name.

See what weird stuff you learn on this forum? *laughs* *cries*

;)

IA56
13th October 2012, 09:09 AM
I can tell from my own life, my mother did not handle well if I cried as a child...so I did develop crying through laughter...and yes I was not able to react as my emotions come or how to express this....I did have all the time to adjust me to my mother or the others in my family, I wanted so badly to keep the peace and I did adjust me so much that I did never develop me or my own feelings or emotions....I did develop for survival and peace making....so these last 6 years as I have worked to find back to my self has not bean any easy ride, but also to become more me....is to be here with you all and know I am not crazy ...I now feel more to be understood in right way. Thanks again to all of you.

DarkChylde
13th October 2012, 04:45 PM
lovely :heart:.