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GMAN12
18th November 2013, 02:31 AM
I shall be going to the hospital later on tomorrow to check up on why the heck my eyes keep randomly getting blurry every could of seconds or stops focusing. Once I ruled out medical, I shall come back here and post. Unless it's not medical, ill still come back here anyways.

SiriusTraveler
18th November 2013, 08:44 AM
Hmm, interesting. Nevertheless I hope everything will be ok.

ButterflyWoman
18th November 2013, 08:59 AM
Be well. Namaste.

CFTraveler
18th November 2013, 02:15 PM
Ditto.

eyeoneblack
18th November 2013, 02:16 PM
Hi, Gman. First you will be tested for diabetes. That will come up negative. Now, I'm thinking of my own experience, which at that point the non-diagnosis was 'idiosyncratic vision anomalies' (fancy way of saying - we don't know). Not too long ago I was in bad need of new prescriptions for glasses. I had to think, is this a good day to get my eyes tested? My vision varies over time and has for many years. I got new glasses which should have helped, but I still have moments or days when my eyes don't focus so well.

I'll be interested what you learn :)

I just thought of this, does the blood pressure in my brain vary? I have high blood pressure that can't be controlled very well with medication, so what if blood pressure goes up putting more pressure on my eyeballs and altering my vision. I don't know.

Also sometimes my eyes dilate so that the world view is overexposed - light is so bright I can hardly see.

GMAN12
18th November 2013, 05:48 PM
Thanks guys and EOB, LOL

CFTraveler
18th November 2013, 06:27 PM
The last time I went to the Dr. he told me that besides my astigmatism, there may be a problem with the visual cortex, because my eyes are ok, but there is no combination of lens thingies to make me see the tiny tiny characters when I'm tired- I unfocus too easily. I shrugged.
When I was younger, I would lose the ability to focus (regardless of eyeglasses) when I was really tired, and, if tired enough, would see double a little.
So that does not surprise me.

GMAN12
18th November 2013, 07:40 PM
Actually I think you're on to something there CF. I had been staying a hotel and sleeping late at night like 2 in the morning ish and waking up at 6 then swimming in extremely chlorinated water and I had been up till about 10 at night when it started to happen. Maybe it could have been what you are saying.

DarkChylde
18th November 2013, 08:53 PM
The last time I went to the Dr. he told me that besides my astigmatism, there may be a problem with the visual cortex, because my eyes are ok, but there is no combination of lens thingies to make me see the tiny tiny characters when I'm tired- I unfocus too easily. I shrugged.
When I was younger, I would lose the ability to focus (regardless of eyeglasses) when I was really tired, and, if tired enough, would see double a little.
So that does not surprise me.

interesting - are you prone to readily seeing phosphenes ?

CFTraveler
18th November 2013, 08:59 PM
Yes I am. In fact, I can alter them at will, something I learned to do when I was studying martial arts.

DarkChylde
18th November 2013, 09:22 PM
most people with astigmatism learn to hone internal visual acuity , the visual cortex is in the very back of your head above the high end of the nape , so actually the anatomical distance from the physical eye to the area where images are made is quite lengthy.
if one pathway fails to accommodate keen vision the remaining pathways undergo facilitated neural growth (the clinical relevance of which is big fat zilch since no one knows what exactly this achieves because ultimately visual prowess gains no good acuity regardless).I suspect some how this also boosts the ability to pick up on phosphenes.
Most of your symptoms are that of Aesthenopia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asthenopia) (aka eye strain) but that itself is a very very broad composite of a constellation of symptoms.
Best remedy is to get as much eye rest as possible and to realize that eyes like the rest of the body if over worked will rebel.

DarkChylde
18th November 2013, 09:28 PM
Asthenopia (aesthenopia) or eye strain is an ophthalmological (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophthalmology) condition that manifests itself throughnonspecific symptoms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonspecific_symptom) such as fatigue, pain in or around the eyes, blurred vision, headache (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headache) and occasionaldouble vision (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diplopia). Symptoms often occur after reading, computer work, or other close activities that involve tedious visual tasks.
When concentrating on a visually intense task, such as continuously focusing on a book or computer monitor, the ciliary muscle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciliary_muscle) tightens. This can cause the eyes to get irritated and uncomfortable. Giving the eyes a chance to focus on a distant object at least once an hour usually alleviates the problem.

what is astounding is that even a meager hourly rest achieves a dramatic cut down in asethenopia , goes to show how important it is to take breaks for applied visual labor.

eyeoneblack
18th November 2013, 10:38 PM
Thanks guys and EOB, LOL

Yep, confirmed.....

CFTraveler
18th November 2013, 10:39 PM
Yeah, but I love reading.... although at this point in my life I have to rely on larger print or the 'zoom' feature of my e-reader. Audiobooks put me to sleep, so that's not an option. Sigh.

DarkChylde
18th November 2013, 11:14 PM
lol! Cf! you dont have to give up reading wholly! - just breaks in b/w to close the eyes to massage the temples would suffice
I've totally totally moved out of the reading phase
that hasn't impacted my visual issues at all in neither a good nor a bad way.
I'm getting lasik in the upcoming few months (imagine a life free of glasses free of contacts)

the very thought giving me goose bumps ; *uber excited*

eyeoneblack
18th November 2013, 11:30 PM
most people with astigmatism learn to hone internal visual acuity , the visual cortex is in the very back of your head above the high end of the nape , so actually the anatomical distance from the physical eye to the area where images are made is quite lengthy.
if one pathway fails to accommodate keen vision the remaining pathways undergo facilitated neural growth (the clinical relevance of which is big fat zilch since no one knows what exactly this achieves because ultimately visual prowess gains no good acuity regardless).I suspect some how this also boosts the ability to pick up on phosphenes.
Most of your symptoms are that of Aesthenopia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asthenopia) (aka eye strain) but that itself is a very very broad composite of a constellation of symptoms.
Best remedy is to get as much eye rest as possible and to realize that eyes like the rest of the body if over worked will rebel.

I like that. I have astigmatism and am to a degree dyslectic, but I have learned against that problem, still I notice it often. (Flip a shoe upside down, soul up, and I would not for certain till you what foot it should go on.) But to 'hone visual acuity' as if the visual occipital region is in need or hampered doesn't make sense. First of all, the idea that there is 'distance' from one region to another in the brain is absurd. Pathologically, as in disease, maybe so, but the healthy brain acts as a integrated whole. Your evidence of eye strain, however, is compelling. The simplest Ocams razor reasoning.

DarkChylde
19th November 2013, 12:02 AM
*Frist off when someone writes "anatomic" distance they mean actual physical morphological distance leaving no room for misinterpretation.

I. First of all, the idea that there is 'distance' from one region to another in the brain is absurd.
*Second off ; Dendrons send out dendrites that that comprise the axon hillock terminating at the synaptic cleft - the amount of time taken for the electric conductive impulse to traverse an axon culminating in the release of AcetylCholine to diffuse from the synaptic cleft into the neural matrix (which compromise the very mechanism of transmission itself) are termed "junctional delay" .

*Third off there is more distance in the brain then it can itself manage , numerous pathways cannot cross each other , so much so that the brain over the antiquity of time had to address this problem by developing specialized structures to overcome the situation , the prime most example of this is the corpus callosum.

Actually maybe eyeoneblack is right , if we are going to make preposterous assumptions based on our own personal belief then let us make us room for one more : maybe there are little microscopic hamsters that churn fairy powered wheels which obviate the need for distant transmission by shooting one impulse from point A to point B (but obviously little pixies have to catch these impulses by hand so guarding little pixen hands by by mitts is the prime point of focus here).

DarkChylde
19th November 2013, 12:12 AM
Your evidence of eye strain, however, is compelling.
really? I'm quite amused how easily you bought into it (I bummed it off of wikki) and we all know how reliable that is.


The simplest Ocams razor reasoning.
that's ironic , doesn't Ocam's razor state that among competing hypotheses the hypothesis that offers the fewest factual assumptions should be selected? (so by your very own word your'e saying lets cut the brain down to the fact there's not distance in it because its the easiest assumption to go?).
The application of this theorem (If I'm not mistaken) when applied shifts the burden of proof in a discussion .The razor states that one should proceed to simpler theories until simplicity can be traded for greater explanatory power. The simplest available theory need not be most accurate. Philosophers also point out that the exact meaning of simplest may be nuanced.


Since neurology is both imperfect and imprecise let us indeed apply the razor , it's already yielded much I see .

ButterflyWoman
19th November 2013, 03:16 AM
When I was younger, I would lose the ability to focus (regardless of eyeglasses) when I was really tired, and, if tired enough, would see double a little.
I've had this all my life. Still do. I thought this was pretty much normal. You saying it isn't?

CFTraveler
19th November 2013, 01:55 PM
I'm sure it is. The thing is, that the last time I went to the doctor to get my routine eye checkup I was in such a state, and he seemed to be baffled, declaring it 'not an eyes thing'.

ButterflyWoman
19th November 2013, 02:30 PM
I've always thought it was more of a "tired brain thing" that just sort of takes the form of sight. :)

eyeoneblack
19th November 2013, 06:34 PM
Just one last comment: My bass player is a doctor, my drummer is a neurologist. Bassman complained of vision problems one night at practice. Drummer described a condition that may be the answer to the vision problems. He said that some people have migraines, but are not aware of it. The 'silent' migraine would cause vision problems.

CFTraveler
19th November 2013, 06:49 PM
Well, I do get migraines, so that could well be it.