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Palehorse Redivivus
29th September 2008, 01:34 AM
A real secret message discovered by a local man among Egypt's ancient ruins could be stranger than the fictional stories we love involving Indiana Jones or "The DaVinci Code."

East Stroudsburg-born Edward Nightingale says he has unraveled the most famous of ancient Egyptian riddles.

And he believes his discovery has uncovered a collection of advanced mathematical principles that could change our understanding of matter and the universe.

But that's not all.

Now, hold on to your seats. He also believes this information was intentionally embedded in the blueprint of the ancient ruins, for future generations to discover.

More: http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.d ... /809280321 (http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080928/NEWS/809280321)

sleeper
29th September 2008, 02:17 AM
i'm really glad that you posted that, and i can't wait to look into it further.

but the links on that page are broken, and i can't seem to find much about his research on google searches, even though there's a lot about him.

Palehorse Redivivus
29th September 2008, 02:35 AM
Poking around a bit more I found the guy's own page...

http://thegizatemplate.com/

It seems that article was from a local news publication in PA where Nightingale is from, and from the "just thrown together yesterday" feel of his page, it seems like he may just now be going public with his material, lol. Might be worth keeping an eye on, tho.

CFTraveler
29th September 2008, 06:45 PM
A couple of things about the article jumped out at me-
Some reporter needs a spanking:


"Everybody who was studying this was using the Fibernachi series, and they were coming up with little snippets of what was occurring. But I wanted to allow an open mind without putting myself in that box," Nightingale said. (Fibernachi numbers are a series of figures built by adding the two prior numbers in the series, for example, 1,1,2,3,5,8.)
Like Google would say,
Does he mean Fibonacci? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci)


the arrangement of the three pyramids matched the Belt of Orion, three stars in the midsection of the Orion constellation. A shaft in one of the pyramids points to the spot in the sky Orion occupied thousands of years ago when the pyramid was built.
Among other things, 4-3-2 is the tuning of an "A" note in the musical scale of the ancients of that era. In music, the first three harmonics are produced at two, three and four times the original note's frequency.
Of what era, and how do harmonics change with age? :?

Fish
29th September 2008, 06:53 PM
That's very interesting! Makes you wonder what else is underneath all that sand..

sleeper
29th September 2008, 09:04 PM
good questions CF.

i did some research, and found this:
http://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/sta/sta19.htm

I've been taught (i don't know if it's true) that we don't know anything about the egyptian musical system. But it might be similar to the pythagorean theory, which i knew nothing about. now it's got my noodle baking.

Palehorse Redivivus
29th September 2008, 09:15 PM
Does he mean Fibonacci? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci)

Lol, that irritated me too... though I kind of skipped over it thinking maybe it was an alternate spelling. I think I've seen too many religion-related documentaries and heard too many lectures where creative spelling and pronunciation for semi-obscure terms is all fair game. :P



the arrangement of the three pyramids matched the Belt of Orion, three stars in the midsection of the Orion constellation. A shaft in one of the pyramids points to the spot in the sky Orion occupied thousands of years ago when the pyramid was built.
Among other things, 4-3-2 is the tuning of an "A" note in the musical scale of the ancients of that era. In music, the first three harmonics are produced at two, three and four times the original note's frequency.
Of what era, and how do harmonics change with age? :?

I think what this is trying to allude to is that different cultures use different musical scales with different notes and numbers of notes in the octave. This is why for instance, traditional Indian, Asian, and Middle Eastern music all have their own distinctive sound.

CFTraveler
29th September 2008, 09:39 PM
Aahh. Ok.

sleeper
29th September 2008, 10:02 PM
I'm still not sure what he discovered.