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View Full Version : Another reason i'll never go back and live in the UK.



Neil Templar
26th February 2009, 04:04 PM
:evil: stupid humans!
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter ... 30325.html (http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/tv/news/disabled-presenter-8216scares-children8217-1630325.html)

ariesr
26th February 2009, 04:49 PM
I'd say it is a case of education for young children.

I reckon I would also have been "wary" (a few nightmares as well) as a young child if I had seen someone during daytime TV with a partial arm clearly visible.

Neil Templar
26th February 2009, 05:31 PM
I'd say it is a case of education for young children.

I reckon I would also have been "wary" (a few nightmares as well) as a young child if I had seen someone during daytime TV with a partial arm clearly visible.
of course, but not if the parents explain that there's nothing "abnormal" about it.
unfortunately in the UK people with disabilities of all sorts are still mostly "invisible", to the general public.
and that's not gonna change anytime soon with parents insisting on keeping them hidden in case their kids have nightmares.

ariesr
26th February 2009, 05:34 PM
It's just another of those views that gradually becomes more informed over the decades, I'm sure it'll happen.

Also, I dont think it's exclusive to the UK, regardless of what the Politically Correct groups in the UK might tell the media.

CFTraveler
26th February 2009, 05:46 PM
I have to say that this kind of ugliness is not only prevalent in the UK. We have some of this here in the US.

Neil Templar
26th February 2009, 06:41 PM
yeah i'm sure it's not just the UK.
for me, it just seems every time i go home to visit, or take the time to see what's going on over there, i'm continuously appalled by what i see in the media and in society in general.
you know i try not to judge people, everyone's entitled to live whatever life they see fit to live, but it just seems so... i don't know what the word i'm looking for is.. Medieval.
i mean, come on people, surely we've evolved a bit.. oh no, apparently not.

it makes living in a society like the Netherlands feel like a luxury, for which i am very grateful.
moving out of the UK was definitely the best move of my life so far..

ariesr
26th February 2009, 07:01 PM
Sure, there's an increasing voice of negativity in the UK, and the media is playing a big part propagating it. If I were to watch News24/Sky News everyday and not go outside my house and get involved in whatever it is I'm interested in, then I'd be likely to believe it's a really bad place outside and I should never go out.

With regard to the TV Presenter issue, it may have only been a hunderd parents that contacted the BBC to complain. With millions of families in the UK, that isnt exactly the sign of a primitive culture. I wouldnt want the complaints to overshadow the amount of positive support this presenter has received recently.

I've considered leaving the UK myself, but for other reasons as well as the issue here.

VioletImagery
26th February 2009, 07:02 PM
I lived in the UK for a year (I am an American now living in Canada) and it did seem like British society was slightly more prejudiced against people who, for whatever reason, were 'different'. I can't say, though, if this is simply because the ways it was expressed were more blatant than I am used to (I grew up in the Midwest where it is rather impolite to express strong opinions on anything) or if the prejudices ARE actually stronger.

Ouroboros
26th February 2009, 08:51 PM
I lived in the UK for a year (I am an American now living in Canada) and it did seem like British society was slightly more prejudiced against people who, for whatever reason, were 'different'. I can't say, though, if this is simply because the ways it was expressed were more blatant than I am used to (I grew up in the Midwest where it is rather impolite to express strong opinions on anything) or if the prejudices ARE actually stronger.

I've only lived in two regions, Midwest and now Southern US. I've been in Texas so long now though that I really only remember the differences when I go back to Minnesota to visit. It IS fun hearing the northern accent and actually being able to recognize it rather than just seeing it as normal though. :)

I'd still rather be in Minnesota. I love my home state...but I have a lot of great things going here in Texas that I wouldn't have in Minnesota, so I'll just have to deal :P

VioletImagery
26th February 2009, 09:00 PM
It IS fun hearing the northern accent and actually being able to recognize it rather than just seeing it as normal though. :)

I know what you mean. I flew back to MN for Christmas and I didn't realize how not-used to it I'd already gotten after being in Montreal for only a few months, until the flight attendant responded to someone's request with "you betcha" and I almost laughed out loud. Hehe.


I love my home state...

Me too.

Timotheus
26th February 2009, 11:19 PM
:D

VioletImagery
26th February 2009, 11:56 PM
To build on the historical memory idea, the UK used to be the ruling center of an empire. It was seen as the source of good taste, culture, refinement, in short, all things respectable, as well as thought of as home, safe warm and familiar (Mother England). Anything or anyone (foreigners, disabled people, the breakdown of class barriers) that serves to contradict these powerful (and still lingering) images is hard for British society to accept. Such things may be more acceptable or even expected in the former colonies (or other places not under British control), since they were supposedly wild, savage places in need of the civilizing British influence anyway.

Beekeeper
1st March 2009, 07:21 AM
Maybe a trip to New Zealand then, Neil?http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,500990,00.html

Neil Templar
1st March 2009, 11:27 AM
haha, indeed Beekeeper, indeed.
it's on my list of must visit places, for when i do get up and go... gimme a year and a half and i'm on my way..
i always wanted to go there. i have a friend who's from NZ, who's a great chef. he wants to open an organic health retreat, with all sorts of treatments available.
i figure over the next year or so, learn a few different types of healing, i've found someone to teach me reiki, and i'm learning the reconnection, plus whatever else i come across.. then, finish up my travels around the world, in NZ , and if it suits, maybe settle there.
they got everything i always wanted around me - sea, sun (some of the year), mountains, forests, english speakin' :wink: , indigenous tribespeople, with a history of tattooing... great!

Timotheus
1st March 2009, 06:53 PM
:D

Beekeeper
2nd March 2009, 09:25 AM
I went there when I was 19. It was a nice place then and I imagine it still is.