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Sachiel
20th June 2009, 05:47 PM
I'm just going to leave this here, as I need to go now. I found it interesting, and it's a short read.

http://www.srichinmoycentre.org/meditat ... yes_closed (http://www.srichinmoycentre.org/meditation/mastering_the_essentials/eyes_open_vs__eyes_closed)

CFTraveler
20th June 2009, 05:55 PM
Interesting. When I started doing energy work I did it with my eyes open to avoid going into REM or something similar. I guess I'll have to try it when I have a few moments of relaxation. One of these days.

star
20th June 2009, 07:51 PM
Isn't the goal to be able to hold a meditative state All the time? Your eyes are open when walking about.

ButterflyWoman
21st June 2009, 04:30 AM
I practice this from time to time. I like to use two candles and place them somewhat apart and then look at both of them at the same time (easier said than done; it's like the way you have to sort of unfocus your eyes to see those magic pictures, remember those?).

Lately, though, I don't have to do that. I can shut my thoughts off and just "be", while I'm perfectly awake and looking at the scenery. I would say it's very similar to a meditative state (it's not actually meditation, but it's too hard to explain what it's actually like; saying it's similar to meditation is close enough).

And no, I don't think the goal of meditation is to be a perpetual meditative state. It's hard as hell to drive like that! ;)

Sachiel
21st June 2009, 04:54 AM
I know exactly what you mean about just being and watching the scenery. just recently I've been feeling like doing that is more effective for me than meditation, and it achieves similar results, but hasn't been researched or (from on viewpoint) polluted with cultural mysticism and ideas happened upon by individuals other than the practitioner.

Plus, it's not dangerous to drive, because you can react to the scenery.

ButterflyWoman
21st June 2009, 07:12 AM
I drive in the open-eyed, no-thought state all the time, and I react very well and quickly, because I'm not distracted by my own thoughts. :)

But I wouldn't want to drive in a theta or delta state... :twisted:

Beekeeper
21st June 2009, 09:43 AM
Sometimes when I drive the half hour to work now I get clairvoyant images like transparencies over the scenery and they are usually confirmed at the other end of the drive. I'm not sure but I think it happens because I practice no-thought for at least part of that time.

Interesting perspective in the article though many of us don't fall asleep after 5 minutes and many people sit upright without support in meditation for the reason of staying awake. It also assumes that what takes place in the dream world isn't spiritual. It's worth a try though.

Timotheus
23rd June 2009, 03:40 PM
:D

Neil Templar
23rd June 2009, 04:53 PM
I drive in the open-eyed, no-thought state all the time, and I react very well and quickly, because I'm not distracted by my own thoughts. :)

But I wouldn't want to drive in a theta or delta state... :twisted:

yep, i get to that state when i cycle around the park. there's something about the smooth fluid movements of cycling.
maybe it helps to be surrounded by water and trees too?
i guess it's just like walking meditation...
sometimes i have binaurals on my headphones to help get there.

Xanth
23rd June 2009, 05:50 PM
I drive in the open-eyed, no-thought state all the time, and I react very well and quickly, because I'm not distracted by my own thoughts. :)

But I wouldn't want to drive in a theta or delta state... :twisted:
"Mushin", is the Japanese term for that state of mind.
It's the state of mind that allows 'doing' without 'thinking'.

Alaskans
6th February 2010, 10:55 AM
Yay! just the topic I was looking for, I'm very interested in this kind of meditation. You notice how our giving up of cares, and how things effect us seems to augment our ability to hold a more bennificial waking brainwave?


I drive in the open-eyed, no-thought state all the time, and I react very well and quickly, because I'm not distracted by my own thoughts. :)

But I wouldn't want to drive in a theta or delta state... :twisted:
"Mushin", is the Japanese term for that state of mind.
It's the state of mind that allows 'doing' without 'thinking'.
Heres a little explanation of brainwaves http://www.web-us.com/brainwavesfunction.htm

I noticed that thinking with words breaks the state but occasionally thinking abstractly without words does not. I wonder if david blane holds some state like that. From what little I've seen of him it looks like hes in some kind of constant concentration.
I'm always observing myself, my thoughts and emotions while awake, I think most of us do. Seems like that too is a kind of waking meditation.

Alaskans
6th February 2010, 11:34 PM
I spent all last night keeping a blank mind and observing myself while I lay in bed. I experienced theta a lot, I didnt fall asleep but could not remember sections of time. I used to use bedtime as my thinking time. Go to sleep thinking of something, wake up hours later still thinking of the same thing but having solved most of it; we continue to function even in sleep, its just that we usually dont remember it. I was observing myself last night while I slept but did not remember. We can use sleep as a time to meditate because we continue our actions while asleep. My dad said he's fallen asleep while driving and woke up pulling into the driveway (yikes!)
One thing I noticed last night, and I've noticed it when holding a state while awake is our physical movements can change our mental state. Last night I held sleepstate while concious and moving by moving at a rate that reflected my brainwaves.. very slowly. Walking meditation is the same, calm slow walking will help create a calm reflective meditative state. Try keeping a calm reflective minstate while powerwalking.

I did a bunch of research thinking and writing on watching TV and what it can tell us about wakefull meditative states but to a rather unsatisfying end.

I guess I just want to know if it is possible to make wakefull meditation as fruitfull and endlessly challenging as sitting meditation. There seems to be no bottom to the depth of sitting meditation, wakefull meditation should be the same.

John Sorensen
26th October 2014, 11:27 AM
I spent all last night keeping a blank mind and observing myself while I lay in bed. I experienced theta a lot, I didnt fall asleep but could not remember sections of time. I used to use bedtime as my thinking time. Go to sleep thinking of something, wake up hours later still thinking of the same thing but having solved most of it; we continue to function even in sleep, its just that we usually dont remember it. I was observing myself last night while I slept but did not remember. We can use sleep as a time to meditate because we continue our actions while asleep. My dad said he's fallen asleep while driving and woke up pulling into the driveway (yikes!)
One thing I noticed last night, and I've noticed it when holding a state while awake is our physical movements can change our mental state. Last night I held sleepstate while concious and moving by moving at a rate that reflected my brainwaves.. very slowly. Walking meditation is the same, calm slow walking will help create a calm reflective meditative state. Try keeping a calm reflective minstate while powerwalking.

I did a bunch of research thinking and writing on watching TV and what it can tell us about wakefull meditative states but to a rather unsatisfying end.

I guess I just want to know if it is possible to make wakefull meditation as fruitfull and endlessly challenging as sitting meditation. There seems to be no bottom to the depth of sitting meditation, wakefull meditation should be the same.

This post is several years old, but I am responding anyway, as it is a topic I don't see discussed very often.

Firstly, I love seated inward-focused meditation, and do that every day for many years for various purposes.

About a year and a half ago, I started practicing a Chinese backwards walking meditation. It comes from the same roots/practices as Tai Chi, Chi Gung, Nei Gong etc. Most days I do 20-30 mins backwards walking with various arm movements. The longest time I have gone for is two hours on several occasions. The rhythmic movement, or rhythm puts you into various states like seated meditation or binaural beats of any form of long duration physical exercise or highly focused short form physical exercise.

The walking alone is only the "outer" practice. Is someone just started walking backwards without the concentration / mindfulness, then they would not be doing the exercise. The internal form is the actual exercise / meditation.

Anyway, I love it, and do it most days, or at least several times a week as well as daily seated meditation. They are great for different purposes, but I use visualisations/intentions during both.