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Magian
6th January 2010, 09:48 AM
Zarathushtra, also known as Zoroaster in Greek, and Zartosht in Farsi, lived about 3700-3800 years ago, in the beautiful and fertile land of the Aryana Vaeja (VejAryana). This man was a Great Sage, Teacher, Philosopher/Poetical Prophet, Astronomer, and Mathematician, but most of all he was the Mâñthran - “the giver of the Manthra". This is how he refers to himself in the Gathas, which are the only remaining product of his life which have survived the turmoil, and sometimes darker side of history to this very day.

It is believed that around age 40, Zarathushtra and his followers found their way to the court of King Vishtasp in Balkh, believed to be modern-day Uzbekistan, or as other sources cite, possibly Northern Afghanistan. There, Zarathushtra is given the chance to explain the truth of his philosophy to the king. King Vishtasp is so impressed with Zarathushtra's explanation of the Creation, in which Ahura Mazda zealously and lovingly manifests himself through the progressive and beneficent process of Evolution, namely the 7 chronological creations: (1) Sky and Luminaries (including Fire); (2) Water (3) Earth coming out of the waters; (4) the Mineral Kingdom; (5) the Vegetable Kingdom; (6) the Animal Creation; and finally; (7) Mankind.

Timotheus
6th January 2010, 01:56 PM
Thank you Magian :D

Magian
6th January 2010, 11:15 PM
I agree, the civilizations of Native America have been portrayed stereotypically throughout hollywood's history.
but they don't have it anywhere as bad as the Persians are misprepresented... Haven't you seen 300?

Both the ancient native americans, and the ancient persians are far more advanced civilizations then they are portrayed through the medias.
Little is known because so much knowledge was destroyed, first when alexander burned down the libraries at persepolis,
and then a more fatal blow in the 6th century AD by the Arab Caliphate..which since then has been a 1400 year hell on earth for the Zoroastrians who tried to preserved their faith.
Books were burned, priests were murdered, and the whole civilian population of the middle east, if they were not converted by the sword, were taxed harshly and treated horribly until they converted.
This eventually led to the middle east we have it as today..a hodge podge of Islamic countries...

but anyways a bit more about zarathushtra:
It is believed that around age 40, Zarathushtra and his followers found their way to the court of King Vishtasp in Balkh, believed to be modern-day Uzbekistan, or as other sources cite, possibly Northern Afghanistan. There, Zarathushtra is given the chance to explain the truth of his philosophy to the king. King Vishtasp is so impressed with Zarathushtra's explanation of the Creation, in which Ahura Mazda zealously and lovingly manifests himself through the progressive and beneficent process of Evolution, namely the 7 creations: (1) Sky and Luminaries (including Fire); (2) Water (3) Earth coming out of the waters; (4) the Mineral Kingdom; (5) the Vegetable Kingdom; (6) the Animal Creation; and finally; (7) Mankind.
(sounds kind of similar to the 7 creations in the Bible..a lot of scholars believe Judaism was heavily influenced by Zoroastrianism during the Babylonian Exile, from which they were freed by the persian king Cyrus the Great when he conquered Babylon)

According to Zarathushtra, the orderliness which regulates all natural phenomena in the universe would lead man to the only rational conclusion that there is a most-wise Intelligence (Ahura Mazda), which through his/her mind was able to plann, design, and fashion for us this physical reality, and put forth the fundamental law of physics into place at the beginning of the universe, so that the cosmos could continue down a miraculous path of progressive growth and development. Zarathushtra refers to these fundamental laws of nature as a part of Asha.

darron
8th January 2010, 07:06 PM
I agree, the civilizations of Native America have been portrayed stereotypically throughout hollywood's history.
but they don't have it anywhere as bad as the Persians are misprepresented... Haven't you seen 300?
.
now now that was a good movie. atleast for what its worth. ive read the ancient history books and it is documened that persia pretty much wanted to capture anything in their paths, persia was no different than any other country, money and power rule not relegion. oh and to projectors why do you still follow a relegion, even though you have went into the astral and have seen that all things are pretty much all thought forms of the human mind.

oh i also found out that 300 is based off a graphic novel, not actual history.

Magian
9th January 2010, 07:43 AM
Darron wrote:
Magian wrote: I agree, the civilizations of Native America have been portrayed stereotypically throughout hollywood's history.
but they don't have it anywhere as bad as the Persians are misprepresented... Haven't you seen 300?
------
"now now that was a good movie. atleast for what its worth. ive read the ancient history books and it is documened that persia pretty much wanted to capture anything in their paths, persia wwas no different than any other country, money and power rule not relegion. oh and to projectors why do you still follow a relegion, even though you have went into the astral and have seen that all things are pretty much all thought forms of the human mind."


Yeah, and the history books you read were based on Greek accounts, probably a bit of Herodotus. Greeks were the enemies of the Persians. So ofcourse the accounts are going to be slandered and biased.
The Persians are a far more ancient civilization, stretching back to the times of the VejAryana. The Persian Empire was one of the few empires that withstood the Roman Empire. Infact, the Roman Empire suffered Persian defeats on multiple occasions. The Emperor Valerian (who btw was the only Roman emperor to ever been captured alive) was defeated, and subsequently used as a human footstool by the founder of the Sassanid Empire, Shapur, as a human footstool for mounting his horse.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWdq_lHFX68

The Sassanid was a brutish empire, but they probably got that from the Romans. If you look back to the Achaemenid Empire, they were an amazingly tolerant and peaceful civilization. The Persian kings took pride in the diversity. The proof is in the Cylinder of Cyrus, housed in the British Museum, and a replica in the United Nations Headquarters NYC. Cyrus, who founded the Achaemenid Empire, abolished slavery, and invented human rights such as freedom of religion. In fact, the American Bill of Rights is based on the Persian Bill of Rights by Cyrus the Great. Xenophon's Cyropaedia was a must read for all the founding Fathers.
The Cyropaedia was the antithesis of Machiavelli's The Prince. Where Machiavelli's the Prince said it was better to be feared than loved
The Cyropaedia always taught is was better to be loved than hated.
In fact, Thomas Jefferson owned multiple copies of the Cyropaedia, now housed in the National Library.
There's no doubt our Deist forefathers founded our government based on ancient Mazdayasni ideals.


And how would an Astral projection keep me from my religion? The Human Mind is seperate from the Human Brain. Mind(which is essentially spirit) and body are connected through our Chakras.
http://www.ashoi.com/Videos.htm

Fogged
13th January 2010, 12:40 PM
I do not know much about Zarathustra, but your posts inspired me to do a bit of searching; and this is what I found.

http://www.livius.org/za-zn/zarathustra/zarathustra.htm

I had a feeling that Zarathustra, in some way, deviated from the teachings of the Rigveda, so the priests of Mithra were not fond of him. I also read somewhere that Christianity is a modern version of Mithraism. I really don't know how far all these theories are right.

darron
13th January 2010, 05:36 PM
I didnt say that it would keep you from youre religion, as most things will not since humans seem to work their mind around something for a more comfortable answer, but i beleive that if i go any farther into this it will be way off topic.

Timotheus
14th January 2010, 05:20 PM
:D

Magian
15th January 2010, 07:13 PM
I do not know much about Zarathustra, but your posts inspired me to do a bit of searching; and this is what I found.

livius.org/za-zn/zarathustra/zarathustra.htm

I had a feeling that Zarathustra, in some way, deviated from the teachings of the Rigveda, so the priests of Mithra were not fond of him. I also read somewhere that Christianity is a modern version of Mithraism. I really don't know how far all these theories are right.

Yes, you are correct in your research! Infact, Zarathushtra went into a complete opposite direction of the RigVeda's. The Rigveda's are from a contemporary time of Zarathushtra. In fact, in the community Zarathushtra grew up in was mostly Proto-Hindu. Zarathushtra was against the polytheism that is common in Hinduism, so for the first (known) time in history, he introduced Monotheism.

And yes Christianity borrowed a lot from Mithraism...but not just Mithraism...Judaism, Manicheism, etc.

darron
20th January 2010, 05:48 PM
:D
lol

your old post made me realize something Tim, although i am not the eagle that flies high like you said, i realized that that is just my own personal belief, i shouldn’t have said that the way i did and everything and i would like to apologize for that, and i have been religious about 80 percent of my life and all, and went to church every Sunday, but i was always constantly worried about burning in "hell" and all this, so when i grew older i just discarded my religion not totally but just stopped worrying about hell and all that. and i found about about astral projection. and just crafted my own beleifs around what i found out, and have experienced and read in various books.
so again i apologize and am greatly sorry about what i said.